5 Principles of Coach Parenting

coach parenting, grounding, teenager, consequence,

5 Principles of Coach Parenting

coach parenting, grounding, teenager, consequence,
 1.  Show up on time or get benched
Hold your kids accountable for their time.  That means homework assignments should be turned in on time, they need to get up and be on time for school, and they need to adhere to a curfew. To be on time, you have to be organized.  This helps them to keep themselves organized and be respectful of rules and limits.
preparation, coach parenting, mikeshanahan2. Preparation
All great coaches prepare their teams for whatever comes their way. They practice in different weather conditions, and try to anticipate their opponent. For parents, preparation means talking about the situations they may face and discussing what they would do.  Use topics in the news about their favorite celeb who posted a picture or a tweet that got them in trouble. Discuss mistake their friends made and how they would handle it.
3. Don’t coach different players the same way
Every player has their own unique talent and they also have different personalities just like your kids. If you have a child who is always respectful, you are not going to come down as hard on them as the child who is constantly breaking rules.  If you have a sensitive child, you have to be more mindful of how you address them than you would with your child who is tougher and more dismissive.
4. Be Enthusiastic
How can the players be enthusiastic, if the coach seems like they don’t care? Be excited about what your kids have to say and make them feel you are in their corner routing for them and helping them realize their dreams.
 5. Pay Attention To Detail
Head coaches watch when their players are half a step short and notice every little thing about their performance so they can correct and help them get better.  As parents, stop scrolling and look up even if your kid is on the sideline and not playing.  Its in those moments you can see if they are all alone, participating in cheering their teammates on, or feeling left out.  That information is more important than what’s going on when they are on the field.